Archive for March, 2014

Golf Fanatic? 2014 will be a great year for Triangle Golfers!

March 24, 2014
The pose of a Champion! Who will pose at the 2014 U.S. Open at Pinehurst?

The pose of a Champion! Who will pose at the 2014 U.S. Open at Pinehurst?

The Triangle will be the focus of golf this year as we welcome both the 2014 U.S. Men’s and Women’s Open to Pinehurst in June. It will be a unique opportunity to watch some of the greatest golfers in the world compete. Nothing is more impressive than witnessing amazing golf shots with millions of dollars in prize money on the line. We all remember the great shot by Payne Stewart to win the U.S. Open in Pinehurst or the more recent Bubba Watson shot to win The Masters in 2012. However, if you are like me, you would much rather play golf then watch it. Here are some of the great opportunities to gather your friends and business associates to play tournament golf in the Triangle this year.

The tournament was named after past president Jack Andrews who supported this tournament. We lost Jack in 2013, but he will never be forgotten!

The tournament was named after past president Jack Andrews who supported this tournament. We lost Jack in 2013, but he will never be forgotten!

I would be remiss if I didn’t place the greatest emphasis on my Rotary’s club golf tournament which will be held at Wildwood Green Golf Club on May 6th. It is a 1 pm shotgun start with pizza lunch provided by Little Caesars. The 5th Annual Jack Andrews Memorial Golf Tournament will benefit the many organizations that the Rotary Club of North Raleigh supports throughout the year. More details can be found here or you can contact me directly as I have the inside information on this event. This is an important fundraiser for this organization and without your support, we cannot help the many people we do every year.

 

The Inaugural Holly Hill Hospital Charity Golf Tournament will be held on May 12th at the Lonnie Poole Golf Course on the NCST Campus. Registration opens at 11 am with a noon shotgun start. Cost is $130 per player and more details can be found here. The Lonnie Poole Golf Course is always a challenging and interesting course so you will want to make your plans to participate in this event.

The Wake Tech’s Sixth Annual Athletic Golf Tournament will be held on April 25th at the Eagle Ridge Golf Club. It sounds like a wonderful event with a silent auction, 50/50 raffle and a $5,000 putt for Cash. More details for this event can be found here.

The Northern Wake Optimist Club’s Golf Tournament will be held on April 4th at the Reedy Creek Golf Course. Proceeds benefit kids in our community. There will be a monetary prize for the top 3 teams. The cost is minimal at $65/player or $260/team and it includes both a bag lunch and dinner after the round. For more information, please visit here.

The Camp Royall Classic Golf Tournament will be held on May 5th at the Preserve at Jordan Lake Golf Club. The tournament will help provide life-changing experiences to children with autism at Camp Royall, the largest and oldest camp exclusively for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the United States. The cost is $500/foursome. You can learn more about this effort and register here.

On June 16th at Bentwinds Country Club, the Eighth Annual Raleigh Area NFFF Golf Tournament will be held. It will support the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation which supports the families of fallen firefighters. The cost is $100/individuals or $400/team with many sponsorship opportunities. For more information on this wonderful event, please click here.

The Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) Golf Tournament will be held on May 15th at River Ridge Golf Club. It will be a 9 am shotgun start and sponsorships are still available. Please visit here for more information.

The Raleigh Claims Association (RCA) Golf Tournament will be held on May 16th at Wilmar Golf Club. It will be a 1 pm shotgun start and cost is minimal at $50/player to include golf and the picnic. For more information, please click here.

The Ed Shook Golf Classic raises money for the education of developmentally challenged children in Wake County!

The Ed Shook Golf Classic raises money for the education of developmentally challenged children in Wake County!

The Ed Shook Golf Classic will be held on September 8th at the famed Raleigh Country Club. Celebrating its 49th anniversary, this event is one to remember and participate. Sponsored by the Frankie Lemmon School and the Rotary Club of North Raleigh, this event directly assist students with developmental challenges. The school was named after the founder’s son shortly after his death. For more information about this event, please visit here or contact me directly.

This is just a sampling of the golf tournaments throughout the Triangle region. As you can see, there are many opportunities to play golf for a good cause. If you have a tournament that I didn’t mention, please let me know and I will promote it as well. You can email me at Steven@BackNineHomes.com. We always try to show as many tournaments as we can, but it is impossible to know all of them.

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Don’t forget to Spring Forward this weekend!

March 7, 2014
Don't forget Daylight Savings Time begins this Sunday, March 9th. Don't be late for church!!!

Don’t forget Daylight Savings Time begins this Sunday, March 9th. Don’t be late for church!!!

As you may know, Daylights Savings Time is set to take effect on the 2nd Sunday of March according to the Energy Policy Act of 2005, which extended the period of DST by about a month in the U.S. So, at 2 am on Sunday morning, you are to ‘Spring Forward’ and make it 3 am…thus losing an hour of sleep on that first day.

The history of DST is an extensive one and one that goes back to Ancient times such as the Roman water clocks that used different scales for different months of the year. The first mention of it in more modern times was by the esteemed Benjamin Franklin, who proposed it when he returned from Paris in 1784. In an essay he published upon his return, “An Economical Project for Diminishing the Cost of Light”, he proposed the change to economize the use of candles by rising earlier to take advantage of the sun. Of course, it was not implemented in his time.

Some credit the modern use of DST to George Vernon Hudson, an entomologist from New Zealand in 1895. He proposed in a paper a two-hour shift forward in October and a two-hour shift back in March. Although there was some interest in his proposal, it was never implemented.

In 1905, William Willett proposed moving the clock forward in the summer and back in the fall to take better advantage of brighter sun in the summers. Many credit him with the modern DST as it was implemented shortly after he suggested it during World War I, though he died in 1915 without it being adopted. A bill was introduced in 1908 in the House of Commons, but was not passed.

DST was first adopted by the Germans to replace artificial lighting and reduce energy usage on April 30, 1916. It was soon followed up by the British and many countries shortly after on both sides of the war to include the U.S. After the war, most countries reverted back to the old standards and it would not return until the 2nd World War.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt instituted year-round DST called “War Time” from February 9, 1942 until September 30, 1945. It was enforced 40 days after Pearl Harbor and the time zones were originally called Eastern War Time, Central War Time and Pacific War Time. After the surrender by Japan in August, 1945 it was relabeled “Peace Time”.

Daylight saving was first recognized as an energy-saving aspect during World War II when Double Summer Time was applied in Britain which moved the clocks two hours ahead of GMT during the summer and one hour ahead of GMT during the winter.

DST caused mass confusion in the U.S. between 1945 and 1966 for trains, buses and broadcasting since many states and municipalities were free to choose whether to use DST and when to implement it. The Uniform Time Act of 1966 ended the confusion as it set the standard that DST would begin the last Sunday in April and end the last Sunday in October. Local municipalities were still allowed to not to use DST by passing a local ordinance.

The U.S. Congress extended the DST to ten months in 1974 and eight months in 1975 after the 1973 oil embargo. It was estimated that DST saved 10,000 barrels of oil per day, but it was still controversial. Some complained that the darker winter mornings were dangerous for the children going to school in the dark. After the energy crisis ended in 1976, the U.S. changed back to the last Sunday in April. It was amended in 1987 to the first Sunday in April and remained unchanged until the Energy Policy Act of 2005 to its current standards, which started in 2007 and began on the second Sunday in March and ends on the first Sunday in November.

DST is not implemented in over 70 countries worldwide and effects over a billion people. Though many countries now observe DST, few use the same schedule as the U.S. The European Union adopted the summer time schedule that had been observed throughout the U.K. for several years where it begin on the last Sunday in March and ends on the last Sunday in October.

This is just a brief history of daylight savings time and more information can be found not he web. If you are interested, you could spend hours reading all of the different accounts of it. In essence, remember to move your clocks forward this Saturday night before bed or risk being late for church on Sunday.